Maryland Winds

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I will be performing on Sunday with a new professional wind band called the Maryland Winds. This group is made up of freelance musicians like myself and retired musicians from the elite military bands in the DC area (“The President’s Own” Marine Band, “Pershing’s Own” Army Band, the Army Field Band, the Navy Band, and the Air Force Band). If you would like to come out to support us, the concert is at 7:00 pm on Sunday evening at Atholton High School. Tickets are free, but you will still need to order them to make sure we have an accurate account of how many people are in attendance.

http://www.marylandwinds.com

The concert will consist of:

Milburn, World Premier Fanfare
Buck, Festival Overture on the Star Spangled Banner
Giroux, Hymn for the Innocent
Curnow, Concertpiece featuring René Hernandez, trumpet soloist
Salfelder, Cathedrals
Bernstein, Suite for Mass
McKenzie, Iron Mahors March
Copland, Variations on a Shaker Melody
Murtha, Scarborough Fair
Nelson, Rocky Point Holiday

Please come out to support Maryland’s newest professional wind band in its inaugural performance.

 

Reflections 


This is the time of year when I see turnover, and it is always a wonderful reminder of how lucky I am to spend my evenings teaching so many amazing, talented, kind young people. I am humbled some days by the thoughtfulness and kindness expressed by a middle schooler or the focus and determination of a fourth-grader or the wit and maturity of a high schooler. 
A vital component of my teaching style is ensuring that I am reinforcing these positive qualities and encouraging my students to take these lessons about music and to apply them in other parts of their lives. Music truly transcends all aspects of life.

In particular, I was blown away by the grace and acceptance shared by one of my students that is struggling with a friend at school. When she said (sic), “I’m hoping it’s just something [my friend] is going through temporarily, because I don’t want to stop being friends because of band stuff. Maybe we can just choose to not talk about band stuff so we can stay friends.” This was after her friend had said some pretty hurtful comments about my student’s playing, even though my student got a much higher score on a playing assessment. How many adults could offer that kind of grace or have the emotional intelligence to recognize the situation beyond pettiness? Incredible!! 

Yesterday, I got a phone call that one of my most promising students is switching to oboe. While I will miss seeing her sweet, happy smile every Saturday morning, I just know she is going to make a fabulous oboist. This talented young lady was third chair in GT Band this year as a fourth-grader on clarinet, so I am fully expecting to see her there again next school year as the top oboist. Her inner beauty and light shines through everything she does, and she will be a blessing to everyone around her. Best of luck, sweet Lydia!! I will miss you and your family, and I thank you for one of the best teaching experiences I have had in my twenty-one years of teaching clarinet. 

These two young ladies are only two examples from this last week of how impressive my students are as people in addition to incredibly talented musicians. I could write a post every week on the character and accomplishments of my students, which is a constant reminder that I am beyond blessed to have this job and these opportunities to work with some of tomorrow’s leaders. Thank you, parents, for sharing your children with me. Thank you for choosing me to guide them. 

Can Your Reeds Make You Sick?

“Throw that away.”

“Why? I’ve been playing on it for weeks, and I like the way it sounds.”

“It’s black.”

“That’s just dirt/marker/pencil.”

“That is not going in your mouth again.”

I cannot recall the exact number of conversations I have had like this with students in the last twenty-one years. What students are willing to shove in their mouths is absolutely astounding, and then their parents cannot figure out why these students are always sick. Hmmmmm.

To prove a point to my students, and any other reed players out there reading this, I have always wanted to do a bacterial test on reeds and mouthpieces. Luckily for my checkbook, Michael Lowenstern did this exact experiment for me. Behold, the reed and mouthpiece bacterial study:

Still think playing on that reed with “just a little bit of black” is okay? Not in my studio!

Kitty Lessons? 

What is the number one reason my students give for not moving lessons from my home? The cat.

Kevin is the sweetest, most gentle, and loving cat any person could meet, and he loves my students so very much. Looks like the feelings are mutual, at least today:

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That crazy cat could probably play clarinet like a pro after nearly twelve years of sitting in on lessons. Love my Kevin!!

Fall Lessons!

Fall lessons have been scheduled successfully for another year! I know I have a few outstanding emails from new students to return, so please expect replies from me today. I had to solidify my schedule with the current studio before adding in new students, which I am sure parents understand and appreciate. Thank you for all the support and your continued wish to see your child achieve their playing goals at a high level!

Fall Lessons